Identify the cause of SQL Server blocking

In my previous article (Different techniques to identify blocking in SQL Server) on MSSQLTips.com, I discussed about locks and blocks, and presented you with an overview on how to troubleshoot and resolve blocks using dynamic management views and Activity Monitor. After I wrote this article, I received several emails from readers asking how they can use the information returned by these dynamic management views (DMVs) to identify SPIDs and other useful information about the processes that are actually causing blocking on a SQL Server instance.

Check out my latest article (Identify the cause of SQL Server blocking) on MSSQLTips.com, in which I shared the query that will help you to quickly identify SPIDs and other useful information about the processes that are causing blocking on SQL Server instance.

Different techniques to identify blocking in SQL Server

SQL Server is able to service requests from a large number of concurrent users. When SQL Server is servicing requests from many customers, there is a strong possibility that conflicts arise because different processes access the same resources at the same time. A conflict in which a process waits a release the resource is a block. Although in SQL Server a blocked process usually resolves itself when the first process releases the resource but there are times when a process holds a transaction lock and doesn’t release it.

Checkout my tip (i.e. Different techniques to identify blocking in SQL Server) in which I discussed various techniques for troubleshooting and resolving blocks in SQL Server. This tip is published on MSSQLTips.com.